Elizabeth Warren’s Pow Wow Chow ‘Cherokee’ recipes were word for word COPIES of famous FRENCH chef’s techniques

Massachusetts Democratic Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren is yet again in hot water after new allegations have surfaced that she plagiarized her ‘Cherokee’ recipes in the book Pow Wow Chow from the New York Times and other publications.

Radio talk show host Howie Carr released damning evidence that appears to confirm that Mrs Warren’s weren’t handed down from generation to generation, they were picked up in the newspaper.

Mrs Warren has been under scrutiny since she first claimed Native American heritage, arguing that because her great-great-great-grandmother was Cherokee, she is a member of the community.

Chow Down: New allegations have surfaced that Elizabeth Warren plagiarized her ‘Cherokee’ recipes in the book Pow Wow Chow from the New York Times and other publications

Heritage: Mrs Warren has been under scrutiny since she first claimed Native American heritage, arguing that because her great-great-great-grandmother was Cherokee, she a member of the community
Heritage: Mrs Warren has been under scrutiny since she first claimed Native American heritage, arguing that because her great-great-great-grandmother was Cherokee, she a member of the community

Heritage: Mrs Warren has been under scrutiny since she first claimed Native American heritage, arguing that because her great-great-great-grandmother was Cherokee, she is a member of the community

The 1984 cookbook Pow Wow Chow was edited by Mrs Warren’s cousin Candy Rowsey and is billed as a collection of recipes from the Five Civilized Tribes.

Mrs Warren’s recipes are featured alongside her mother’s directions for sugar cake and her two children’s recipe for peach cobbler.

Mrs Warren’s recipes include herbed tomatoes and a crab with tomato mayonnaise dressing, among other dishes.

But it appears that at least three of the five recipes featured in the book were fakes, according to an investigation by Mr Carr.

The two recipes for Crab with Tomato Mayonnaise Dressing and Cold Omelets with Crab Meat appear to be word for word copies of a French chef’s design.

‘When I was chef at Le Pavilion it enjoyed a considerable esteem in America, and the owner, Henri Soule, had one particular specialty that he would ask to have prepared for his pet customers. The dish was a great favorite of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and Cole Porter,’ wrote chef Pierre Franey in an article syndicated by the New York Times News Service on August 22, 1979.

The Original? The two recipes for Crab with Tomato Mayonnaise Dressing and Cold Omelets with Crab Meat appear to be word for word copies of a French chef's design

The Original? The two recipes for Crab with Tomato Mayonnaise Dressing and Cold Omelets with Crab Meat appear to be word for word copies of a French chef’s design

Taste Test: The ingredient lists may differ, but the preparation of the dishes are nearly identical
Taste Test: The ingredient lists may differ, but the preparation of the dishes are nearly identical

Taste Test: The ingredient lists may differ, but the preparation of the dishes are nearly identical

Mrs Warren lists 10 ingredients for the cold omelet, while Mr Franey lists only four, but the preparation of the omelet is nearly identical, with both detailing the use of a ‘seven-inch Teflon pan.’

‘Heat about one-half teaspoon butter in the pan. Add about one-third cup of the egg mixture. Let cook until firm and lightly brown on the bottom, stirring quickly with a fork until the omelet starts to set. When set slip a large pancake turner under the omelet starts to set. When set, slip a large pancake turner under the omelet and turn it quickly to the other side. Let cook about five seconds. Remember, you want to produce a flat omelet, not a typical folded omelet. Turn the omelets out flat onto a sheet of was paper. Continue making omelets until all the egg mixture is used,’ Mrs Warren wrote.

The only difference in the recipes is that Mr Franey said the egg mixture should be ‘lightly browned.’

Childhood: Since entering the race for the senate, numerous investigations have centered around her heritage

Childhood: Since entering the race for the senate, numerous investigations have centered around her heritage

A third recipe for Herbed Tomatoes appears to be lifted directly from a recipe in a 1959 Better Homes and Gardens magazine, down to Mrs Warren’s instructions for how to enjoy the dish.

‘Great accompaniment to plain meat and potatoes meal!’ both Mrs Warren and the Better Homes author say.

Since entering the race for the senate, numerous investigations have centered around her heritage.

In the 1990s, when Harvard Law came under fire for having a poor diversity-hiring record and a faculty dominated by white male professors, the school widely publicized Mrs Warren’s alleged Native American roots.

Response: Mrs Warren's camp has not responded to any of the allegations that she has been inflating her ancestry for the benefit of her career

Response: Mrs Warren’s camp has not responded to any of the allegations that she has been inflating her ancestry for the benefit of her career

In 1996, school paper the Harvard Crimson quoted a Harvard Law spokesperson saying that ‘of 71 current Law School professors and assistant professors, 11 are women, five are black, one is Native American and one is Hispanic.’

But just last week, Breitbart.com claimed Mrs Warren’s ancestor Jonathan Crawford was a member of the Tennessee Militia who rounded up Cherokees from their family homes as part of the Trail of Tears – a stark contrast to Mrs Warren’s claims.

Mrs Warren’s camp has not responded to any of the allegations that she has been inflating her ancestry for the benefit of her career.

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