Category: Perspectives

Border Clash- November 25, 2013

Officials say a flier distributed prior to the clash at the border told people to meet there so they could cross into the U.S. together

Original Story: https://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/Unruly-Crowd-Attack-Organized-at-US-Mexico-Border-San-Diego-233698631.html read on

Reprint from 2013: Border Patrol- Crowd Confronts Agents

Border Patrol agents respond to a crowd one-eighth of a mile north of the U.S.-Mexico border in the Tijuana River channel. / U.S. Customs and Border Protection photo

Susan Shroder and Elizabeth AguileraContact Reporters Original Story: https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/sdut-border-patrol-rock-throwing-san-ysidro-2013nov25-story.html

A group of about 100 people trying to illegally cross the border Sunday near the San Ysidro port of entry threw rocks and bottles at U.S. Border Patrolagents, who responded by using pepper spray and other means to force the crowd back into Mexico, federal officials said. read on

Sunspots and Cell Towers Fueled the Northern California Firestorm

Go to the profile of James Grundvig

Forest fire scarred mountain slopes in the Colorado Rockies, where pine trees were stripped bare by the fire. [Credit: James Grundvig, August 11, 2017.]

Two seismic, overlapping events — one celestial, the other manmade — created the unique condition igniting the Northern California fires that swept through wine country on October 8 and 9. The chain reaction setoff more than a dozen clusters at the same time scattered across multiple counties on one hellish night. read on

What will not burn in a fire

Suffering a house fire is a devastating experience. Each year, $8.6 billion in property loss is estimated due to fires, according to FEMA. When the damage is severe, countless precious belongings are lost, depriving the owners of a portion of their lives. However in many cases, there are a select few items that withstand the inferno. The average house fire burns at a temperature of about 1,100 degrees Fahrenheit, which isn’t hot enough to destroy most metals and earthly-made substances. And if an item is well-placed and small in size, its chances of survival increase drastically. Below is a list of things that are often found intact underneath the rubble during the aftermath of a house fire. read on

Lessons learned and ignored from a fire that destroyed 3,450 homes

By 

Published: Oct 19, 2016 6:17 p.m. ET

Conditions that contributed to the Oakland Hills fire 25 years ago re-emerge

Courtesy California Office of Emergency Services
A firefighter silhouetted in the flames of the Oakland Hills firestorm of Oct. 20, 1991. The fire killed 25 people and destroyed nearly 3,500 homes.

For Jim and Veronica Harris, the morning of Oct. 20, 1991, in the hills just above Oakland, Calif., was hot, dry and ominously windy. From the third-story balcony of their home on Estates Drive, they watched as a tall cloud of gray and black smoke marched steadily toward them. Soon, they began to see pine trees literally explode from the heat. “We looked at it and turned to each other and said, ‘This doesn’t look good,’ so we started packing,” said Veronica Harris, a retired nurse and speech pathologist who now lives in Denver. read on

Thousands of homes incinerated but trees still standing: Paradise fire’s monstrous path
Ariel view of destruction from the Camp fire in Paradise off of Clark Road. The Camp Fire has burned more than 7,000 structures in Paradise. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

Driving toward Paradise on the afternoon of Nov. 8, Jonathan Pangburn was less worried about the flames burning through the forest than he was about the smoke. Black and thick, it billowed over the road like a dangerous fog, cutting visibility to less than three feet in places. read on

California fires: Death toll reaches 42, making Camp Fire deadliest in state’s history

Canada’s brain-injured Cuba diplomats speak out about Ottawa’s silence

Power company under pressure to explain actions before California wildfire

Some victims of California’s worst-ever wildfire are asking why the state’s largest utility didn’t shut off power in areas that were at high risk. The death toll from the Camp Fireis up to 77, and that number is likely to rise.

Nearly 1,000 other people are unaccounted for. In 11 days, the fire has destroyed more than 10,000 homes north of Sacramento, the state’s capital.

Pacific Gas & Electric said two of its power lines failed in areas where the fire broke out a short time before the first flames were reported. It highlighted one failure the day the fire began but then waited more than a week to report the second until more information was available.

PG&E said the fire forecast did not meet the criteria for a “public safety power shutoff.” The cause of the fire is still under investigation.